ACT ONE MAGAZINE REVIEWS BRUCE COHEN’S ALBUM “FIVE BC”

Denmark’s Act One Magazine has reviewed Bruce Cohen’s album “Five BC” and states . . . “This is clearly an artist who had a vision and it seems to me like he hit a home run with this one.”

 

Read the entire review HERE, and also download a FREE mp3 of “What Is It” and watch the “What Is It” video.

 

ALEX FAULKNER REVIEWS BRUCE COHEN’S ALBUM “FIVE BC”

Alex Faulkner has reviewed Bruce Cohen’s album Five BC for his UK blog The Faulkner Review.

After listening to the entire 12-track album Faulkner declared, “Bruce Cohen deserves recognition as a class act in his field and this album should help bring him to a wider audience.”  To read the full review and download a FREE mp3 of track 8 “What Is It” click HERE. 

 

 

“What Is It” Video By Bruce Cohen

“What Is It” is track 8 on Bruce Cohen’s album Five BC, released by Tarock Music 8/18/18. The video takes you to outer space and swept through the universe. The song has a mysterious/funk feel, while the bass and drums drive the groove, and sweeping synths add the melody.

CREDITS: Composed and performed by Bruce Cohen. Video concept, film clip compilation and production by Theresa Marchione. © 2018 Tarock Music

Download a free mp3 of “What Is It” ► https://soundcloud.com/tarockmusic/what-is-it

 

Tarock Music Releases Bruce Cohen’s 5th Solo Album “Five BC”

Tarock Music has released a new album by Bruce Cohen marking his fifth solo venture.  The twelve-song electronic excursion that continues his signature take on ambient music with the added element of funk.  His 2017 album Four BC was a constrained four-minute per song  experiment, while Five BC was recorded with a no time limit total stream-of-conscience approach.  Cohen literally took to heart Miles Davis’ witticism when asked the name of the song he was about to perform saying, “I’ll play it and tell you later,” so Cohen didn’t title his songs until after they were recorded.  The result is tracks that are an indisputable electronic classic, using a progressive house groove while weaving atmospheric textures of subtlety and beauty, demonstrated by Cohen’s artful skill of manipulating various moods.

Read the entire Liner Notes text HERE, and download a FREE mp3 of track 8 “What Is It” on SoundCloud HERE.

 

 

 

New Single Release By Bruce Cohen ◆ “Big Guy Returns”

TAROCK MUSIC HAS RELEASED “BIG GUY RETURNS” AN ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTAL BY BRUCE COHEN.

“BIG GUY RETURNS” HAS A GREAT 1970’s HERBIE HANCOCK HEAD HUNTERS FUNK GROOVE, WITH AMBIENT TEXTURES.

LISTEN TO THE TRACK ON SOUNDCLOUD

 

Stereo Stickman’s Exclusive Interview With Bruce Cohen

If you haven’t yet explored Bruce Cohen’s latest album Four BC, you most certainly should. The story behind it is a unique and interesting one, but more importantly – the music is well worth taking the time out to experience.

We caught up with the artist behind it all for an in depth chat about creativity, inspiration, touring, the future of electronic music, and much more.

Here’s how it went ► http://www.tarockmusic.com/stereo_stickman__bruce_cohen_interview/

(A free mp3 of “Seen” can be downloaded at the end of the interview.)

Bruce Cohen’s “Four BC”. . . .”gives nods to shows like Twin Peaks and Stranger Things.”

Kicking off with opening track ‘Haus’, Bruce Cohen’s latest release Four BC hits out hard with a fierce beat that grabs the attention immediately.  Without much hesitation, we are sent headfirst into a dizzying spiral of woozy ambient samples and an intoxicating melody made up of swirling glacial notes.  There’s a slight tone of dread sitting beneath it all, while Cohen’s production keeps things wide and airy at the same time.  His music builds gradually, adding various new elements to the mix as it progresses, constantly growing and holding the attention.

The underlying darker tones are maintained as we are led into ‘Luna’, with its sparse atmospheric pads that heave and groan under their own weight, giving a nod towards the soundtracks of shows like Twin Peaks and Stranger Things.  Those earlier glacial notes return, adding contrast and atmosphere, with a sense of space that really pulls the listener in.  As it develops, it becomes all embracing, reaching out and wrapping the listener into its own carefully constructed world of sonic mystery. Where are we being taken?  Will we make it out alive?  This is when the confident beat of ‘Lost’ kicks in, and we now find ourselves in an utterly alien landscape.  Tones fly back and forth like an extraterrestrial language, trying to communicate but we are here without a translator.

Once you have made it a few tracks in to Four BCyou’ll begin to feel at home.  It’s like being transported to another world but it’s not scary or overwhelming.  Rather, it is entirely welcoming, where the listener is invited to relax and engage on whatever level they might feel able.  It’s not the kind of ambient music where you can totally check out and let it wash over you – although it could quite easily serve that purpose – because there is so much going on that it really demands close attention and inspection.  Sounds shift and change, never staying still but constantly evolving and reforming into new throbs and washes.

Whenever there has been a moment where things feel like they are really winding down (‘Rise’), suddenly we are headlong into a new sequence which takes us in a whole other direction (‘Seen’).  In many ways Four BC is like being invited to a huge mansion and given the freedom to wander around to investigate its many rooms.  As you begin to do so, you realize that every room is totally different with new things to discover.  And further still, you begin to realize that each room has something in common with all the others.  There is a plan here, Cohen has very carefully constructed a sequence of spaces that are totally consistent yet always offering something new.  As a result, the album sits somewhere between chilled out ambient and cerebral EDM, making it the kind of record that can be listened to in a range of settings and for different listening purposes. It’s relaxed, but won’t send you to sleep.  It’s engaging, but won’t exhaust you either.

• Chris Marsh • CrossRadar