“Going Down Slow” Gets Music Blogged

musicbloggedRick Shaffer is an artist with a truly distinctive approach to his vision and sound. This talented musician cleverly combines alternative music and country rock in order to create songs that hit the spot emotionally and technically.

The songs on Rick’s recently released album Outside Of Time demonstrate high quality musicianship and timeless song-writing wits, reminding me of the sound of seminal influencers including the likes of Neil Young, The Cramps or The Blasters, just to mention but a few.

The album’s lead single “Going Down Slow” does a great job of driving the album with a set of stunning rhythms and melodies. The song effortlessly goes between blues, rock and country. The aesthetics of the song have a truly 60s flavor, but the arrangement and the production value have a punch that is all modern and up-to-speed with the needs and want of today’s audience.

Rick is a charismatic performer whose style is refreshingly direct, iconic and versatile. Behind its thought-provoking enigmatic title, this album hides a refreshingly down-to-earth approach that goes back to the roots of Rick’s passion.

Ben Corke – Music Blogged

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Tarock Music Releases Rick Shaffer Video ∎ TALKING ABOUT YOU

02_5381708“Talking About You” is track 5 on Rick Shaffer’s 2013 album release, STACKED DECK.

All the photographs in the video are the work of photographer, Morris Huberland (1909—2003). Mr. Huberland’s family immigrated from Poland to New York City’s Lower East Side in 1920. In 1940, he joined New York’s Photo League, citing Eliot Elisofon’s lectures on photojournalism as influential to his artistic approach. In the 1950’s he took numerous photographs in various NYC neighborhoods, labeling them, “Girl Gang.” Mr. Huberland continued to exhibit work into the 20th and 21st centuries at various New York City institutions, including: the Museum of Modern Art, the International Center of Photography, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and the Jewish Museum. Additionally, his photographs often accompanied articles published in The New York Times.

In August 2016 The New York Public Library made hundreds-of- thousands of photographs for use with no fees, allowing Images to be used, reused and shared commercially and otherwise, and can be downloaded from their digital collection ► http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/ The Morris Huberland photographs compiled for this video are from The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Photography Collection, at The New York Public Library.

WATCH THE VIDEO ► https://youtu.be/Tz6r3KSH8qU